A Figment of My Imagination – Daydreaming

Which comes first imagination or daydreams?

According to the dictionary they are synonymous.  Castles in the air… fool’s paradise… head trip… in a zone… mind trip… musing… phantasm… pie in the sky… pipe dream… woolgathering… whatever you call it, it’s daydreaming. If you have done it, raise your hand. If you still daydream, a mere thumbs up will do.

 

The Muse

Could “daydreaming” be at the root of an Artist’s Muse? I often say that I don’t have a Muse. I do not need external inspiration or motivation to paint or write. It’s like Artist Chuck Close has said, “Inspiration is for amateurs, the rest of us just show up and get to work.”

 

I have always been a daydreamer.   For this discussion, I’ve come full circle… that’s where creativity enters my life.   Maybe I do have a Muse and just don’t know it. Oh well. I was raised on a farm although the first seven years of my life were in a small Kansas town. I was a loner, no one to play with. Aloneness morphs into daydreaming. What else is a kid to do while driving a tractor for hours and hours, and hating it. Daydreams were my escape from the reality of farming chores. I was my way of dealing with negative feelings.

 

Daydreams on the Farm

Some daydreams were somewhat unrealistic. I dreamed I was a quintuplet and had been adopted as my birth parents could not afford all five boys. I dreamed I was a millionaire. I dreamed I came from royalty and my birth parents wanted me to have a normal life. I dreamed of having a normal life, whatever that is. I most frequently dreamed of becoming a professional singer. I had started singing at a very early age, 4 or 5. I sang at school, church and social events, as well as entered every talent contest in our community. I received nothing but praise.

 

I Wanted to be a Singer

When I announced my aspirations, suddenly that praise was negated. It was gut-wrenching, at least I felt as if I’d been kicked in the gut. Parental comebacks followed: “You’ll never be able to make a living doing that. You need to be a teacher.” I was rebellious and majored in vocal performance in college. I eventually became a successful teacher, but after teaching for thirteen years I still daydreamed of singing. Guess what, it didn’t work out. Could the lack of support have anything to do with my lack of success? I went on to a corporate career as a manager.

 

Throughout the years, I have successfully tried other creative ventures. I acted in a number of community theatre productions. I took up creative writing. I taught myself to paint. I had to prove to myself that anything is possible. Now, I am a professional artist and I am writing this blog.

 

The Take-Away

The take-away for you readers, especially you parents, please do not discourage your kids from pursuing their dreams. Be their inspiration, be their Muse, if you will. Encourage them to dream big. Be their most supportive fan, and it will not only enrich their lives but also yours. I am thankful that I finally found creative niche.